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Signs of Alzheimer's appear decades in advance! Abnormalities in this indicator can increase the risk of dementia by 60%

Signs of Alzheimer's appear decades in advance! Abnormalities in this indicator can increase the risk of dementia by 60%

  • Categories:Medical knowledge
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  • Time of issue:2022-03-21 15:38
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Signs of Alzheimer's appear decades in advance! Abnormalities in this indicator can increase the risk of dementia by 60%

(Summary description)Dementia affects an estimated 50 million people worldwide, and this number is expected to more than triple by 2050, especially in low- and middle-income countries, where, according to the report, about two-thirds of people with dementia live. Women are also more likely to develop dementia than men.

 



There is currently no cure for this form of dementia, so prevention is especially important in reducing the growing global burden of dementia. According to the Lancet Commission on Dementia Prevention, Intervention and Care, 40% of dementia cases can be attributed to modifiable risk factors, including lower education levels, high blood pressure, obesity, hearing loss, smoking, depression , physical inactivity, social isolation, diabetes, alcohol consumption, traumatic brain injury and air pollution.

 



 


Notably, dyslipidemia was not included in the list of modifiable risk factors. So in preventing dementia, is there no need to worry about cholesterol?

High levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in midlife are associated with an increased risk of dementia ten years later, according to a recent study published in the journal Lancet Health and Longevity. The study found that among people under the age of 65 whose cholesterol was measured, those with LDL-C levels above 190 mg/dL (4.92 mmol/L) had more LDL-C levels over 10 years than those with levels below 100 mg/dL (2.59 mmol/L). The risk of later being diagnosed with dementia was about 60% higher.

The strength of the association between LDL-C and dementia was comparable to that of alcohol consumption and even greater than that of hypertension risk factors. The study provides the strongest evidence yet on the relationship between blood cholesterol and dementia and Alzheimer's disease.


 



DOI:10.1016/S2666-7568(21)00150-1

 


Low-density lipoprotein is a lipoprotein particle that carries cholesterol into peripheral tissue cells. Since cholesterol must be combined with lipoproteins to be transported to various parts of the body, cholesterol often exists in the form of lipoproteins in the blood, mainly divided into low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) . Low-density lipoprotein transports cholesterol from the liver to tissues throughout the body, and high-density lipoprotein transports cholesterol from various tissues back to the liver for metabolism.

When there is an excess of low-density lipoprotein, the cholesterol it carries will accumulate on the arterial wall, which can easily cause arteriosclerosis for a long time. Therefore LDL is called "bad cholesterol".

So what level of "bad cholesterol" LDL-C represents dyslipidemia? In order to let the public have a good understanding of their blood lipid health, the NCEP ATP III report in the United States divides LDL-C into 5 levels for the prevention and treatment of dyslipidemia, as follows:


 

 


< 2.59 mmol (100 mg/dL) is an appropriate level;
2.59 ~ 3.34 mmoL (100 ~ 129 mg/dL) is a near appropriate level;
3.38 ~ 4.12 mmol/L (130 ~ 159 mg/dL) is a critical high level;
4.14 ~ 4.89 mmol/L (160 ~ 189 mg/dL) is high;
≥ 4.92 mmol/L (190 mg/d) is an extremely high level


 


For the study, researchers took blood cholesterol measurements of more than 1.8 million British adults over the age of 40 between 1992 and 2009 and followed them for up to 23 years. The investigators stratified analyses according to age at first measurement (<65 years or ≥65 years) and duration of follow-up (<10 years or ≥10 years).

Because of the large cohort size, the researchers focused on blood cholesterol measurements in middle-aged (under 65 years old) with less disease and followed up for more than 10 years. The researchers analyzed blood total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol and triglycerides with subsequent risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

At the end of study follow-up, among those diagnosed with dementia, the mean age at diagnosis was 79.7 years for men and 82.1 years for women. The average level of blood lipids was 5.62mmol/L (total cholesterol), the average level of low-density lipoprotein was 3.42mmol/L; the average level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was 1.45mmol/L.

Findings found a modest positive association between LDL cholesterol and dementia, with an adjusted ratio (RR) for each SD increase in LDL cholesterol (1.01 mmol/L or 39 mg/dL increase) of 1.05. This suggests that higher LDL cholesterol levels are associated with greater risk of dementia.

Is there a difference between lipid levels in middle age and later life and dementia risk?


To clarify this question, the researchers further analyzed that, for people younger than 65 years (middle age) when their cholesterol was first measured and diagnosed with dementia 10 years after their cholesterol was measured, each 1-1 increase in LDL cholesterol The adjusted RR for one SD was 1.17; for those diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, the adjusted ratio (R

  • Categories:Medical knowledge
  • Author:
  • Origin:
  • Time of issue:2022-03-21 15:38
  • Views:0
Information
Dementia affects an estimated 50 million people worldwide, and this number is expected to more than triple by 2050, especially in low- and middle-income countries, where, according to the report, about two-thirds of people with dementia live. Women are also more likely to develop dementia than men.
 

1

There is currently no cure for this form of dementia, so prevention is especially important in reducing the growing global burden of dementia. According to the Lancet Commission on Dementia Prevention, Intervention and Care, 40% of dementia cases can be attributed to modifiable risk factors, including lower education levels, high blood pressure, obesity, hearing loss, smoking, depression , physical inactivity, social isolation, diabetes, alcohol consumption, traumatic brain injury and air pollution.
 
1
 

Notably, dyslipidemia was not included in the list of modifiable risk factors. So in preventing dementia, is there no need to worry about cholesterol?

High levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in midlife are associated with an increased risk of dementia ten years later, according to a recent study published in the journal Lancet Health and Longevity. The study found that among people under the age of 65 whose cholesterol was measured, those with LDL-C levels above 190 mg/dL (4.92 mmol/L) had more LDL-C levels over 10 years than those with levels below 100 mg/dL (2.59 mmol/L). The risk of later being diagnosed with dementia was about 60% higher.

The strength of the association between LDL-C and dementia was comparable to that of alcohol consumption and even greater than that of hypertension risk factors. The study provides the strongest evidence yet on the relationship between blood cholesterol and dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

 
1
DOI:10.1016/S2666-7568(21)00150-1
 

Low-density lipoprotein is a lipoprotein particle that carries cholesterol into peripheral tissue cells. Since cholesterol must be combined with lipoproteins to be transported to various parts of the body, cholesterol often exists in the form of lipoproteins in the blood, mainly divided into low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) . Low-density lipoprotein transports cholesterol from the liver to tissues throughout the body, and high-density lipoprotein transports cholesterol from various tissues back to the liver for metabolism.

When there is an excess of low-density lipoprotein, the cholesterol it carries will accumulate on the arterial wall, which can easily cause arteriosclerosis for a long time. Therefore LDL is called "bad cholesterol".

So what level of "bad cholesterol" LDL-C represents dyslipidemia? In order to let the public have a good understanding of their blood lipid health, the NCEP ATP III report in the United States divides LDL-C into 5 levels for the prevention and treatment of dyslipidemia, as follows:

 

 

  • < 2.59 mmol (100 mg/dL) is an appropriate level;
  • 2.59 ~ 3.34 mmoL (100 ~ 129 mg/dL) is a near appropriate level;
  • 3.38 ~ 4.12 mmol/L (130 ~ 159 mg/dL) is a critical high level;
  • 4.14 ~ 4.89 mmol/L (160 ~ 189 mg/dL) is high;
  • ≥ 4.92 mmol/L (190 mg/d) is an extremely high level

 

For the study, researchers took blood cholesterol measurements of more than 1.8 million British adults over the age of 40 between 1992 and 2009 and followed them for up to 23 years. The investigators stratified analyses according to age at first measurement (<65 years or ≥65 years) and duration of follow-up (<10 years or ≥10 years).

Because of the large cohort size, the researchers focused on blood cholesterol measurements in middle-aged (under 65 years old) with less disease and followed up for more than 10 years. The researchers analyzed blood total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol and triglycerides with subsequent risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

At the end of study follow-up, among those diagnosed with dementia, the mean age at diagnosis was 79.7 years for men and 82.1 years for women. The average level of blood lipids was 5.62mmol/L (total cholesterol), the average level of low-density lipoprotein was 3.42mmol/L; the average level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was 1.45mmol/L.

Findings found a modest positive association between LDL cholesterol and dementia, with an adjusted ratio (RR) for each SD increase in LDL cholesterol (1.01 mmol/L or 39 mg/dL increase) of 1.05. This suggests that higher LDL cholesterol levels are associated with greater risk of dementia.

Is there a difference between lipid levels in middle age and later life and dementia risk?


To clarify this question, the researchers further analyzed that, for people younger than 65 years (middle age) when their cholesterol was first measured and diagnosed with dementia 10 years after their cholesterol was measured, each 1-1 increase in LDL cholesterol The adjusted RR for one SD was 1.17; for those diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, the adjusted ratio (RR) per SD increase in LDL cholesterol was 1.30.

For people aged 65 years or older when their cholesterol was first measured, the association between LDL cholesterol and dementia was weaker, with an RR of 1.07.

This suggests that higher lipid levels in middle age are associated with a greater risk of developing dementia compared with higher lipid levels in later life.

 
1

 

RRs for dementia diagnosis per SD increase in LDL cholesterol by age at measurement and follow-up time


As mentioned above, the NCEP ATP III report in the United States divides LDL-C into five levels for the prevention and treatment of dyslipidemia, so the researchers further analyzed the relationship between these five levels of LDL-C and dementia.

The study found that among people younger than 65 years old and followed for more than 10 years, those with LDL levels above 190 mg/dL were more likely to be diagnosed with dementia more than 10 years later compared with those with levels below 100 mg/dL. About 60% higher risk (fully adjusted ratio (RR) of 1.59)

 
1

RRs of LDL-cholesterol for different categories of diagnosis of dementia according to age at measurement and follow-up time

In addition, the researchers found a weaker association between total cholesterol and dementia incidence, while there was no consistent association between high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides. This suggests that the association between total cholesterol and dementia is driven by LDL cholesterol.

Taken together, the study suggests that high levels of LDL cholesterol increase the risk of developing dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Dementia and Alzheimer's disease are devastating diseases for individuals and their loved ones, and so far there is no cure, so aggressive prevention remains key. Protecting your memory and thinking starts with maintaining the right level of LDL cholesterol!

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Focus on research and development, to be a leading manufacturer of high-tech medical equipment research and development Changchun Xianying Medical Technology Co., Ltd. is an enterprise specializing in the medical device industry. It is committed to being a leading high-tech medical device R&D and manufacturing manufacturer, and is committed to becoming one of the innovative leading companies in the medical device field. Since its establishment in 2007, Xianying Medical has been adhering to the concept of "focusing on health and caring for life", adhering to the enterprise spirit of "innovation, dedication, diligence and efficiency", and regards the maintenance of life and health as its responsibility. For a long time, Xianying Medical has devoted itself to the research and development of medical devices for dyslipidemia, arteriosclerosis, diabetes and other diseases using biophysical theory, and has a strong R&D team. The Key Laboratory of Academician Ren Luquan, the academician, has cooperated to jointly research and develop products in the field of big health. In 2013, Xianying Medical cooperated with the Suzhou Institute of Biomedical Engineering Technology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences to establish a quantum biology engineering technology center. Based on quantum biology technology, through the study of biomolecular structure, electromagnetic properties, energy conversion and chemical reactions, from molecular At the electronic level, we can study and explain life phenomena and study life processes, and develop a series of medical products and related solutions for the field of metabolic syndrome and autoimmune diseases.
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